Orientation – an introduction

Chalmers (1995) points out the hard and easy problems of consciousness and initiates a non-reductive approach to conscious experience by determining it fundamental. Orientation allows the next step of empiricising this self-referencing foundation of our actuality as projection occupying space, and takes it to its universal source that is our individual whole being.

“Orientation” is a method that allows for our reality to be captured in space in its actuality as projection, and placed in relation with its whole. It does not attempt to describe our reality or parts of it beyond their fundamental condition as projection. Though with Orientation we can label the components that make up our reality, its main purpose is to refer to “where” rather than determine “what” those parts are, so as for us to be in relation with the whole of whom our reality, including our self, as a part.

We are created by a whole being, created by him (or her) and projected or placed in space through his CNS (Central Nervous System). I use the terms whole self, whole being and whole body interchangeably, to refer to whom we as self and the world we may experience (the phenomenal world) are projected parts. The whole body includes the solid body as well as his projected parts and is, as a whole, more than the sum of his parts.

Reality is referred to as what the whole body is in and of, and as the basis for our projected version of the things in reality – the whole self is exposed to aspects of reality that present to his physical sensors and he creates, according to what he senses, our phenomenal world or the world we may experience, within our reality as projected through his CNS.

Within our reality of experience, we normally identify in ourself and with what we experience exclusive of and so isolated from our whole self. We identify with the things in our phenomenal world within our reality, even in knowing they are projected versions and indications of what and who may be in reality. They are an illusion as considered by some including Buddhists, and a delusion if we regard them to be reality when we know they are projection. Nevertheless, we can be functional in our identification with them, and think we act and exist in the world, when it is the whole self who is and does things in reality.

However, we can also play our part in becoming a part of the whole self. By recognising our reality as a part, we can accept our incompleteness (as all parts are of themselves) and allow for our self and our worlds outside and within, even as we identify with them, to be placed in relation with our whole. A process of integration ensues for our part with our whole, through layers of what are psychological and psychic assertions of our reality – what we determine and hold to, in our exclusive identification that isolates us from our whole. They are set in levels, projected through the physical body and have an anatomical reference.

Our destiny lies in a relation with our whole, who is of the ever changing and multi pointed reality. Perfection may be placed with the whole self as a goal, reference or guide. It is symbolised in the gravitational alignment of our whole’s core organ, in the level, split and domed brain, vertical spine and even nerve roots of the CNS, and involves his integration with the integration of his parts.

For more on Orientation please follow the link to website www.gendohcr.com or alternatively see Orientation chapters in this blog.

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